Blood pressure tests: nearly one in ten referred to doctor

Nearly one in every ten people whose blood pressure was tested over four hours outside Kerikeri New World today (Saturday) had unusually or dangerously high blood pressure. The readings were taken by St John staff with the data collected and recorded by Kerikeri Rotarians for the Stroke Foundation.

Of the 161 people tested during the Stroke Foundation’s sixth annual blood pressure awareness day 15 were referred to their doctors. Five of these confessed to skipping existing blood pressure medication.

“I’m really hoping that the 15 stroke candidates we referred to the health system today take their warning from St John seriously,” said Rotary Club of Kerikeri President Bruce Mathieson. “If today’s exercise prevents just one premature death it will have been four hours well spent.”

There is a very strong association between high blood pressure and strokes, the third largest killer in New Zealand and a major cause of disability.

“The big thing is to know what your blood pressure should be and to have it checked regularly,” Mathieson said. “The lower your blood pressure the less likely you are to have a stroke.”

People can find out more about strokes, how to recognise the danger signs and how to prevent them at www.stroke.org.nz.

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All clear. Rachel Edwards (20) of Pakaraka gets her free blood pressure check-up from St John paramedic Nick Scott. The smiles were justified as Rachel’s blood pressure was at healthy levels.

All clear. Rachel Edwards (20) of Pakaraka gets her free blood pressure check-up from St John paramedic Nick Scott. The smiles were justified as Rachel’s blood pressure was at healthy levels.

For enquiries please contact:

Peter Heath, Due North PR
09-4074695 / 021-456353
peter@duenorthpr.co.nz

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